Face Mug Workshop: Berkeley Springs Ice House

 

Face Mugs made during an Ice House workshop with Crawford Horne

Face Mugs made during an Ice House workshop with Crawford Horne

Spice up Valentine’s Day with a Face Mug workshop at Berkeley Springs’ beloved Ice House Gallery.  Crawford Horne, Berkeley Springs potter, will bring pre-made mugs (or you can hand build your own), and lead you through the technical aspects of sculpting a face.  Wine and snacks are provided, or you can bring your own.  Your mug will then be bisque fired, glazed, and fired again, before returning to you….ready for your morning coffee!

Corks and Creations: Face Mug Workshop

Saturday, February 14, 4-6:30 pm at the Berkeley Springs Ice House

$35 for MAC members, $40 for non-members

call 304.258.2300 to register

As Thistle Glen Pottery, Crawford makes functional pottery influenced by his heritage and travels. His work is fired in his unique bourry box wood kiln, as well as a small gas kiln, and can be seen during the Berkeley Springs Studio Tour weekends, at the Ice House Gallery, and soon as part of the Berkeley Springs Farmers Market, where he shares a booth with his wife, Leigh, and her lovely home-grown produce.  (visit Thistle Glen Pottery on Facebook)

 

Advertisements

Lorton Workhouse Cup Exhibit: Drink This!

“The seemingly endless stream of creative endeavor from ceramic artists never ceases to amaze me,” says Phil Rogers, juror for the Lorton Workhouse International Cup Show ‘Drink This!’  Many regional makers are included in this exhibit, including Allison Coles Severance:

Allison Coles Severance mug, part of Drink This! at the Workhouse.

Allison Coles Severance mug, part of Drink This! at the Workhouse.

The exhibit runs January 10 (opening) through February 2.

While the Workhouse opened as an Arts Center in approximately 2008, its’ past use as an open-air prison for vagrants and derelicts is quite rich.  Situated along the Occoquan River in Lorton, The Workhouse Prison opened in 1910 in the format of an ‘industrial farm’ where prisoners built their housing and food system from scratch. Women were also housed in the Workhouse, including suffragists protesting in DC.  The Workhouse Museum is worth a visit while you’re there.